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Moving of body by body, as hard to be | Conscience is our own opinion of our own

conceived as by spirit, 196, § 28. Operates only by impulse, 94, § 11. What, 114, § 11.

The author's notion of his body, 2 Cor. ver. 10, 220, and of his own body, 1 Cor. xv. 35, &c. 222. The meaning of the same body, 218. Whether the word body be a simple or complex term, 221. This only a controversy about the sense of a word, 228. But, its several significations, 308, § 5. Capacity, 112, § 3.

Capacities, to know their extent, useful, 34, § 4.

To cure scepticism and idleness,35, §6.
Are suited to our present state, 35, § 5.
Cause, 204, § 1.

And effect, ib.
Certainty depends on intuition, 342, § 1.
Wherein it consists, 383, § 18.
Of truth, 384.

To be had in very few general proposi-
tions concerning substances, 392, §

13.

Where to be had, 395, § 16.
Verbal, 386, § 8.
Real, ib.

Sensible knowledge, the utmost cer-
tainty we have of existence, 415, § 2.
The author's notion of it not danger-
ous, 336, &c.

How it differs from assurance, 432, § 6.
Changelings, whether men or no, 381, §
13, 14.
Clearness alone hinders confusion of
ideas, 106, § 3.

Clear and obscure ideas, 242, § 2.
Colours, modes of colours, 145, § 4.
Comments upon law, why infinite, 312,
§ 9.

Complex ideas how made, 107, § 6: 110,
§ 1.

In these the mind is more than passive, ib. § 2.

actions, 53, § 8.

Consciousness makes the same person,

211, § 10: 213, § 16.

Probably annexed to the same indi-
vidual, immaterial substance, 216,
§ 25.

Necessary to thinking, 77, § 10, 11:
81, § 19.
What, ib. § 19.
Contemplation, 102, § 1.
Creation, 204, § 2.

Not to be denied, because we cannot conceive the manner how, 414, § 19. Definition, why the genus is used in definitions, 271, § 10.

Defining of terms would cut off a great
part of disputes, 322, § 15.
Demonstration, 343, § 3.

Not so clear as intuitive knowledge,
343, § 4: 344, § 6, 7.
Intuitive knowledge necessary in each

step of a demonstration, 344, § 7. Not limited to quantity, 344, § 9. Why that has been supposed, ib. § 10. Not to be expected in all cases, 418, § 10.

What, 428, § 1: 445, § 15.
Desire, 149, § 6.

Is a state of uneasiness, 159, 100, §
31, 32.

Is moved only by happiness, 163, § 41.
How far, 164, § 43.

How to be raised, 165, § 46.

Misled by wrong judgment, 171, § 60. Dictionaries, how to be made, 334, 335, § 25.

Discerning, 105, § 1.

The foundation of some general max-
ims, ib. § 1.

Discourse cannot be between two men,
who have different names for the same
idea, or different ideas for the same
name, 89, § 5.
Despair, 149, § 11.

Ideas reducible to modes, substances, Disposition, 181, § 10.

and relations, ib. § 3.

Comparing ideas, 106, § 4.

Herein men excel brutes, ib. § 5.
Compounding ideas, 107, § 6.

In this is a great difference between
men and brutes, ib. § 7.
Compulsion, 154, § 13.
Confidence, 435, § 7.

Confusion of ideas, wherein it consists,
243, § 5, 6, 7.

Causes of confusion in ideas, 243, 244,

§ 7, 8, 9: 245, § 12.

Disputing. The art of disputing prejudi-
cial to knowledge, 319, 320, § 6, 7, 8, 9.
Destroys the use of language, 320, § 10.
Disputes, whence, 127, § 28.
Disputes, multiplicity of them owing to
the abuse of words, 324, § 22.
Are most about the signification of
words, 329, § 7.

Distance, 112, § 3.
Distinct ideas, 243, § 4.

Divisibility of matter incomprehensible,
198, § 31.

Of ideas, grounded on a reference to Dreaming, 146, § 1.

names, 244, 245, § 10, 11, 12.

Its remedy, 245, § 12.

Confused ideas, 243, § 4.

Seldom in some men, 79, § 14. Dreams for the most part irrational, 80,

§ 16.

In dreams no ideas but of sensation, or reflection, 80, § 17.

Duration, 120, § 1, 2.

Whence we get the idea of duration, 120, 121, § 3, 4, 5.

Not from motion, 123, § 16.
Its measure, ib. § 17, 18.

Any regular periodical appearance, 124, § 19, 20.

None of its measures known to be exact, 125, § 21.

We only guess them equal by the train

of our ideas, ib. § 21. Minutes, days, years, &c. not necessary to duration, 126, § 23. Change of the measures of duration, change not the notion of it, ib. § 23. The measures of duration, as the revolutions of the sun, may be applied to duration before the sun existed, 126, 127, § 24, 25. 28.

Duration without beginning, 126, §

26.

How we measure duration, 127, § 27, 28, 29.

Recapitulation, concerning our ideas of duration, time, and eternity, 128, § 31. Duration and expansion compared, 129, § 1.

They mutually embrace each other, 133, § 12.

Considered as a line, ib. § 11. Duration not conceivable by us without succession, 133, § 12. Education, partly the cause of unreasonableness, 261, § 3.

Effect, 204, § 1.

Enthusiasm, 452.

Described, 453, § 6, 7.
Its rise, ib. § 5.

Ground of persuasion must be exam-
ined, and how, 454, § 10.
Firmness of it, no sufficient proof, 455,
§ 12, 13.

Fails of the evidence it pretends to,
ib. § 11.

Envy, 149, § 13, 14.
Error, what, 457, § 1.

Causes of error, ib.

1. Want of proofs, ib. § 2.

2. Want of skill to use them, 458, §5. 3. Want of will to use them, 459, § 6.

4. Wrong measures of probability, 460, § 7.

Fewer men assent to errors than is

supposed, 464, § 18.

Essence, real and nominal, 277, § 15. Supposition of unintelligible, real essences of species, of no use, ib. § 17.

Real and nominal essences, In simple ideas and modes always the same, in substances always different, 578, §

18.

Essences, how ingenerable and incorruptible, ib. § 19.

Specific essences of mixed modes are of men's making, and how, 284, § 3. Though arbitrary, yet not at random, 285, § 7.

Of mixed modes, why called notions, 287, § 12.

What, 289, § 2.

Relate only to species, 290, § 4.
Real essences, what, 291, § 6.
We know them not, 292, § 9.
Our specific essences of substances are
nothing but collections of sensible
ideas, 295, § 21.

Nominal are made by the mind, 297,
§ 26.

But not altogether arbitrarily, 298, § 28.

Nominal essences of substances, how made, ib. § 28, 29.

Are very various, 299, § 30: 300, § 31.
Of species, are the abstract ideas the
names stand for, 273, § 12, 278,
§ 19.

Are of man's making, 273, § 12.
But founded in the agreement of
things, 276, § 13.

Real essences determine not our spe-
cies, 276, § 15.

Every distinct, abstract idea, with a name, is a distinct essence of a distinct species, 276, § 14.

Real essences of substances, not to be known, 391, § 12.

Essential, what, 289, § 2: 290, § 5. Nothing essential to individuals, 290, § 4.

But to species, 291, § 6.

Essential difference, what, 290, § 5. Eternal verities, 419, § 14.

Eternity, in our disputes and reasonings about it, why we are apt to blunder, 246, § 15.

Whence we get its idea, 127, § 27. Evil, what, 163, § 42.

Existence, an idea of sensation and reflection, 91, § 7.

Our own existence we know intuitively, 408, § 3.

And cannot doubt of it, ib.

Of created things, knowable only by our senses, 415, § 1.

Past existence known only by memory, 418, § 11.

Expansion, boundless, 129, § 2. Should be applied to space in general, 119, § 27.

Experience often helps us, where we think not that it does, 100, § 8.

Extasy, 146, § 1.

Extension: we have no distinct ideas of very great, or very little extension, 246, § 16.

Of body, incomprehensible, 195, § 23, &c.

Denominations, from place and extension, are many of them relatives, 206, § 5.

And body not the same thing, 114, § 11.

Its definition insignificant, 115, § 15. Of body and of space how distinguished, 89, § 5: 196, § 27.

Faculties of the mind first exercised, 109, § 14.

Are but powers, 155, § 17. Operate not, 155, 156, § 18, 20. Faith and opinion, as distinguished from knowledge, what, 428, 429, § 2, 3. And knowledge, their difference, 429, § 3.

What, 435, § 14.

Not opposite to reason, 447, § 24. As contra-distinguished to reason, what, 447, § 2.

Cannot convince us of any thing con

trary to our reason, 449, § 5, 6. 8. Matter of faith is only divine revela

tion, 451, § 9.

Things above reason are only proper
matters of faith, 550, § 7. 9.
Falsehood, what it is, 386, § 9.
Fancy, 104, § 8.

Fantastical ideas, 249, § 1.
Fear, 149, § 10.

Figure, 112, § 5, 6.

Figurative speech, an abuse of language, 327, § 34.

Finite, and infinite, modes of quantity, 137, § 1.

All positive ideas of quantity, finite, 139, § 8.

Forms, substantial forms distinguish not species, 292, § 10.

Free, how far a man is so, 156, § 21.

A man not free to will, or not to will, 157, § 22, 23, 24.

Freedom belongs only to agents, 155, § 19.

Wherein it consists, 158, § 27. Free will, liberty belongs not to the will, 154, § 14.

Wherein consists that which is called free will, 157, § 24: 165, § 47. General ideas, how made, 107, § 9. Knowledge, what, 377, § 31. Propositions cannot be known to be true, without knowing the essence of the species, 387, § 4.

Words, how made, 268, § 6, 7, 8. Belongs only to signs, 271, § 11. Gentlemen should not be ignorant, 459, § 6.

Genus and species, what, 271, § 10.
Are but Latin names for sorts, 286,
§ 9.

Is but a partial conception of what is
in the species, 300, § 32.
And species adjusted to the end of
speech, 301, § 33.

And species are made in order to general names, 302, § 39. Generation, 204, § 2.

God immovable, because infinite, 194, § 21.

Fills immensity, as well as eternity, 129, § S.

His duration, not like that of the creatures, 133, 134, § 12.

An idea of God not innate, 64, § 8. The existence of a God evident, and obvious to reason, 65, § 9.

The notion of a God once got is the likeliest to spread and be continued, 66, § 9, 10.

Idea of God late and imperfect, 68, § 13.

Contrary, 68, 69, § 15, 16.

Inconsistent, 68, § 15.

The best notions of God got by thought

and application, 69, § 15.

Notions of God frequently not worthy of him, 69, § 16.

The being of a God certain, ib. proved, 409.

As evident as that the three angles of a triangle are equal to two right ones, 72, § 22.

Yea, as that two opposite angles are equal, 69, § 16.

More certain than any other existence without us, 410, § 6.

The idea of God not the only proof of his existence, 410, § 7.

The being of a God the foundation of morality and divinity, 410, § 7. How we make our idea of God, 198,

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Desire of good how to be raised, 165, § 46, 47.

Habit, 181, § 10.

Habitual actions pass often without our notice, 100, § 10.

Hair, how it appears in a microscope, 191, § 11.

Happiness, what, 163, § 42.

What happiness men pursue, 164, § 43.

How we come to rest in narrow happiness, 170, 171, § 59, 60.

Hardiness, what, 88, § 4. Hatred, 148, § 5: 149, § 14. Heat and cold, how the sensation of them both is produced by the same water at the same time, 96, § 21. History, what history of most authority, 434, § 11.

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Ideas, their original in children, 62, § 2: 68, § 13.

None innate, 70, § 17.

Because not remembered, 71, § 20. Are what the mind is employed about, in thinking, 75, § 1.

All from sensation or reflection, ibid, § 2, &c.

How this is to be understood, 349. Their way of getting, observable in children, 76, § 6.

Why some have more, some fewer ideas, 76, § 7.

Of reflection got late, and in some very

negligently, 77, § 8.

Their beginning and increase in chil-
dren, 82, § 21, 22, 23, 24.
Their original in sensation and reflec-
tion, 82, § 24.

Of one sense, 83, § 1.
Want names, 83, § 2.

Of more than one sense, 128, § 1.
Of reflection, 86, § 1.

Of sensation and reflection, 90, § 1.
As in the mind, and in things, must
be distinguished, 93, § 7.
Not always resemblances, 95, § 15.
Which are first, is not material to
know, 99, § 7.

Of sensation often altered by the judg-
ment, 100, § 8.

Principally those of sight, 100, § 9.
Of reflection, 109, § 14.

Simple ideas men agree in, 119, § 28.
Moving in a regular train in our minds,
122, § 9.

Such as have degrees want names, 145, § 6.

Why some have names and others not, 146, § 7.

Original, 178, § 73.

All complex ideas resolvable into simple, 181, § 9.

What simple ideas have been most modified, 181, § 10.

Our complex idea of God, and other spirits, common in every thing but infinity, 199, § 36.

Clear and obscure, 242, § 2.
Distinct and confused, 243, § 4.
May be clear in one part and obscure
in another, 245, § 13.

Real and fantastical, 247, § 1.
Simple are all real, 248, § 2.
And adequate, 249, § 2.

What ideas of mixed modes are fan

tastical, 248, § 4.

What ideas of substances are fantastical, 249, § 5.

Adequate and inadequate, 249, § 1. How said to be in things, 249, § 2. Modes are all adequate ideas, 250, § 3.

Unless as referred to names, 250, 251, § 4, 5.

Of substances inadequate, 253, § 11. 1. As referred to real essences, 351, 352, § 6, 7.

2. As referred to a collection of simple ideas, 352, 8. Simple ideas are perfect Tua, 254,

§ 12.

Of substances are perfect Tua, 254, § 14.

Of modes are perfect archetypes, 254, $ 14.

True or false, 254, § 14, &c. When false, 259, 260, § 21, 22, 23, 24, 25.

As bare appearances in the mind, neither true nor false, 255, § 3. As referred to other men's ideas, or to real existence, or to real essences, may be true or false, 255, § 4, 5.

Reason of such reference, 256, § 6, 7,8.

Simple ideas referred to other men's

ideas least apt to be false, 256, § 9. Complex ones, in this respect, more apt to be false, especially those of mixed modes, 256, § 10.

Simple ideas referred to existence are all true, 257, § 14: 258, § 16. Though they should be different in different men, 258, § 15. Complex ideas of modes are all true 258, § 17.

Of substances when false, 259, § 21, | Ignorance, our ignorance infinitely ex-

&c.

When right or wrong, 260, § 26.

That we are incapable of, 373, § 23.
That we cannot attain, because of their
remoteness, 373, § 24.

Because of their minuteness, 374, §

25.

Simple have a real conformity to
things, 378, § 4.

And all others but of substances, 378,
§ 5

Simple cannot be got by definitions
of words, 281, § 11.
But only by experience, 282, § 14.
Of mixed modes why most compound-
ed, 287, § 13.

Specific, of mixed modes, how at first
made instance in kinneah and
niouph, 304, § 44, 45.

ceeds our knowledge, 372, § 22.
Causes of ignorance, 373, § 23.
1. For want of ideas, 373.

2. For want of a discoverable connex-
ion between the ideas we have, 375,
§ 28.

3. For want of tracing the ideas we
have, 376, § 30.

Immensity, 112, § 4.

How this idea is got, 137, § 3.
Immoralities, of whole nations, 54, 55,
§ 9, 10.

Immortality not annexed to any shape,
382, § 15.
Impenetrability, 87, § 1.
Imposition of opinions unreasonable,
431, § 4.

Impossible est idem esse et non esse,
not the first thing known, 49, § 25.

Of substances: instance in zahab, 305, | Impossibility, not an innate idea, 62,
§ 46, 47.

Simple ideas and modes have all ab-
stract as well as concrete names,
309, § 2.

Of substances, have scarce any abstract
names, 309.

Different in different men, 313, § 13.
Our ideas, almost all relative, 151,
§ 3.

§ 3.
Impression on the mind, what, 42, § 5.
Inadequate ideas, 249, § 1.
Incompatibility, how far knowable, 369,
§ 15.

Individuationis principium, is existence,
207, § 3.

Infallible judge of controversies, 67,
§ 12.

Particular are first in the mind, 311, Inference, what, 427, 428, § 2, 3, 4.

§ 9.

General are imperfect, 311, § 9.

How positive ideas may be from pri-
vative causes, 93, § 4.

The use of this term not dangerous,
36, &c. It is fitter than the word
notion, 37.

Other words as liable
to be abused as this, 38. Yet it is
condemned, both as new, and not
new. 59. The same with notion,
sense, meaning, &c. 338.
Identical propositions teach nothing, 403,
§ 2.

Identity not an innate idea, 62, 63, § 3,
4, 5.

And diversity, 206, § 1.

Of a plant, wherein it consists, 208,
§ 4.

Of animals, 208, § 5.

Of a man, 208, § 6: 209, § 8.
Unity of substance does not always
make the same identity, 209, § 7.
Personal identity, 210, § 9.
Depends on the same consciousness,
211, § 10.

Continued existence makes identity,
218, § 29.

And diversity, in ideas the first per-
ception of the mind, 339, § 4.
Idiots and madmen, 108, § 12, 13.

Infinite, why the idea of infinite not

applicable to other ideas as well as
those of quantity, since they can
be as often repeated, 138, § 6.
The idea of infinity of space, or num-
ber, and of space, or number infi-
nite, must be distinguished, 139, § 7.
Our idea of infinite very obscure, ib.
§ 8.

Number furnishes us with the clearest

ideas of infinite, 140, § 9.

The idea of infinite, a growing idea,
ib. § 12.

Our idea of infinite, partly positive,
partly comparative, partly negative,
141, § 15.

Why some men think they have an

idea of infinite duration, but not of
infinite space, 143, § 20.

Why disputes about infinite are usual-
ly perplexed, 144, § 21.
Our idea of infinity has its original in
sensation and reflection, ib. § 22.
We have no positive idea of infinite,
141, § 13, 14: 142, § 16.

Infinity, why more commonly allowed
to duration than to expansion, 129,
§ 4.
How applied to God by us, 137, § 1.
How we get this idea, ib. § 2, 3.

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