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and warm in eternal youth, lies in the words of Jesus: "Become as little children."

Indeed, much that Jesus said to his time and contemporaries, our inner spirit now says to us and to our time. What was said at the time of Jesus, and more particularly with reference to the beginning of a wholly new view of life, is now again spoken, as it were, to all mankind, and finds its application in all human relations with reference to the endeavors of man to attain a higher stage of human perfection. Thus, we are now told: "If you will not fulfill in yourselves and in your children the spiritual requirements of childhood and boyhood, if you will not secure this for yourselves and your children, you will not attain what in the happiest, most blissful periods of your life caused your soul to swell with hope, what your heart yearned for in the noblest hours of your life, what lifts and ever lifted the souls, what fills and ever filled the hearts of the noblest human beings."

When we concentrate in one point the elevation of culture which the human being has attained by the developing education so far discussed, we find quite definitely the following: The boy has reached the point of divining his independent spiritual self; he feels and knows himself as a spiritual whole. There has been aroused in him the ability to grasp a whole in its unity and in its diversity, as well as the ability to represent outwardly a whole as such and in its necessary parts, to represent in and through outward diversity his own self in the unity and diversity of his being.

Thus, we find the human being even at the earlier stages of boyhood fitted for the highest and most im

portant concern of mankind, for the fulfillment of his destiny and mission, which is the representation of the divine nature within him.

To secure for this ability skill and directness, to lift it into full consciousness, to give it insight and clearness, and to exalt it into a life of creative freedom, is the business of the subsequent life of man in successive stages of development and cultivation. To discuss ways and means for this, and to introduce these in the practice of life, is the purpose of a continuation of this work and of the author's life.

THE END.

OF

HERBERT SPENCER.

EDUCATION:

INTELLECTUAL, MORAL, AND PHYSICAL

1 vol., $1.25. Cheap edition paper, 50 cents

CONTENTS.

1. What Knowledge is of most 2. Intellectual Education.

Worth?

3. Moral Education.

4. Physical Education.

SOCIAL STATICS;

OR,

THE CONDITIONS ESSENTIAL TO HUMAN HAPPINESS SPECI
FIED, AND THE FIRST OF THEM DEVELOPED.

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THE STUDY OF SOCIOLOGY.
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5. Representative Government. 6. Prison Ethics.

7. Railway Morals and Railway Policies.

8. Gracefulness.

9. State Tamperings with Money and Banks.

10. Parliamentary Reforms: the Dangers and the Safeguards. 11. Mill versus Hamilton-the Test of Truth.

RECENT DISCUSSIONS

IN SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY, AND MORALS. 1 vol. $2.00.

CONTENTS.

1. Morals and Moral Sentiments.
2. Origin of Animal-Worship.
3. The Classification of the Sci-

ences.

4. Postscript: Replying to Criticisms.

6. Of Laws in general and the Or-
der of their Discovery.

7. The Genesis of Science.
8. Specialized Administrations.
9. What is Electricity?

10. The Constitution of the Sun.
11. The Collective Wisdom.
12. Political Fetichism.
13. Mr. Martineau on Evolution.

5. Reasons for dissenting from the Philosophy of Comte.

THE MAN versus THE STATE.

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