Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

A

PLAN

FOR THE

PARTICULAR HISTORY

OF

Condensation and Rarifaction, &c.

SECT. I.

A TABLE OF ENQUIRY FOR THE PARTICULAR HISTORY OF DENSITY AND RARITY IN NATURAL

BODIES,

ARTICLE I.

Tables of Rarifaction and Condensation. LET a table be formed, from particular experiments, to shew by inspection, the specific gravities, or different weights of all tangible bodies, under equal dimensions; with relation to gold; and explain the construction, nature, and uses of this table.

Let tables also be formed of bodies, under the same dimensions, whole, and in powder; crude and distilled; as also of pneumatical bodies, according to their degrees of expansion. The

whole of this to regard the expansion of matter in bodies; according to their different consistencies, whilst at rest.

II. The dilatations caused by simple introsusception; or the admission of one body into the pores of another.

If possible, let the enquiry be here diligently prosecuted about the appetites and motions of bodies, whereby they swell and sink, rarify and condense, dilate and contract, &c. because this is of great use; as, at once, serving to disclose, and govern nature. And yet it must proceed summarily; because the subject of density and rarity is so copious and general, that, if fully prosecuted, it would anticipate many of the following titles; which should not be allowed of. III. Dilatation of the innate spirit, expanding itself.

Let the enquiry pass on to the dilatations and tumefactions of bodies; caused by their own internal spirit; whether naturally, or preternaturally; but without fire, or manifest external

heat.

IV. The dilatations and relaxations of bodies, by means of actual, simple, external heat.

This enquiry properly belongs to the subjects of heat and cold, dilatation, separation, and alteration; yet some knowledge of the relaxations of bodies by fire is here necessary, for the more

commodious carrying on of the enquiry into condensation and rarifaction. Let this therefore, be touched only as in passage.

V. Dilatations by external heat in distillations.

The enquiry should next proceed to the dilatations and relaxations of bodies by heat in distillations; which affords a better opportunity, than coction or calcination, of discovering the exact process of this kind of relaxation: but as the prosecution hereof properly belongs to the title of heat and cold, and the motion of dilatation and separation; it should be sparingly touched under the present article, though it were otherwise useful to dwell thereon.

VI. The dilatations and relaxations of bodies by the remission of cold.

Let the enquiry next proceed to the dilatations and relaxations of bodies, upon the remission of violent cold; or a less comparative degree of heat; as in thawing, &c.

VII. The dilatation and relaxation of bodies by potential heat; or the auxiliary spirits of other bodies.

From the dilatations made by external heat, and the remission of cold; proceed to those made by potential heat; or the assisting spirits of another body applied. And as for the business of potential heat, it is proper to consult the medicinal tables of secondary qualities; from thence

to collect the things that separate by dilatation in the human body.

VIII. The dilatation of bodies by a releasement of their spirit.

Next proceed to the dilatation of bodies made by a releasement of their spirits; upon breaking the prisons of the grosser parts, which closely detained them; so that they could not dilate themselves.

IX. The dilatation happening upon the meeting and uniting of bodies related.

This kind of dilatation is, in some cases, called dissolution; though it happens without any manifest tumult. Enquire out the instances hereof.

X. The dilatation by assimilation; or the conversion of a grosser matter to such as is more subtile.

This is understood of an actual conversion of one body into the substance of another: the more eminent instances whereof are to be carefully collected.

XI. Dilatations or distractions, by external force. These dilatations or distractions, are such as proceed not from any appetite in the dilated body; but from the violence of a body external; which prevailing, obliges the other to dilate.

XII. Dilatations by diffusion; or spreading.

This being a spurious kind of dilatation it need not be here very particularly enquired into:

« ForrigeFortsæt »