A History of England in the Eighteenth Century, Bind 5

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Side 460 - Our political system is placed in a just correspondence and symmetry with the order of the world, and with the mode of existence decreed to a permanent body composed of transitory parts; wherein, by the disposition of a stupendous wisdom, moulding together the great mysterious incorporation of the human race...
Side 462 - We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason ; because we suspect that this stock in each man is small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations, and of ages.
Side 522 - If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men will be fitted to it ; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear, every hope will forward it ; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty current in human affairs, will appear rather to resist the decrees of Providence itself, than the mere designs of men. They will not be resolute and firm, but perverse and obstinate...
Side 449 - How much the greatest event it is that ever happened in the world ! and how much the best...
Side 463 - The nature of man is intricate, the objects of society are of the greatest possible complexity, and therefore no simple disposition or direction of power can be suitable either to man's nature or to the quality of his affairs.
Side 463 - ... it is with infinite caution that any man ought to venture upon pulling down an edifice which has answered in any tolerable degree for ages the common purposes of society, or on building it up again, without having models and patterns of approved utility before his eyes.
Side 461 - You see, Sir, that in this enlightened age I am bold enough to confess that we are generally men of untaught feelings : that, instead of casting away all our old prejudices, we cherish them to a very considerable degree...
Side 506 - What is government more than the management of the affairs of a nation? It is not, and from its nature cannot be, the property of any particular man or family, but of the whole community...
Side 520 - Fredy could meet this wonderful man when he is easy, happy, and with people he cordially likes ! But politics, even on his own side, must always be excluded ; his irritability is so terrible on that theme that it gives immediately to his face the expression of a man who is going to defend himself from murderers.
Side 354 - What, then, strictly speaking, is an act of Sovereignty? It is not a convention between a superior and an inferior, but a convention between the body and each of its members.

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