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MR. LANCASTER'S SCHOOL.

nation is indebted for having discerned the utility, and encouraged the progress of a system of education, which has entirely originated from the benevolent zeal and ability of Mr. Lancaster, a member of a religious community long known, as well for the purity of their minds as for the simplicity of their dress and deportment, who, after many arduous experiments, has matured a plan by which one thousand poor children may be taught and governed by one master, for the trifling expence of five shillings per annum for each child: a plan which is eminently honorable to its meritorious discoverer, and promises fair to effect an incalculable amelioration in the habits and condition of the rising generation.

We are not allowed upon the continent to be a people of much creative faculty, but this plan is solely of British growth, and till lately, wholly unknown to political economists of every other country. This cheap and efficacious system, which has received, to their lasting honor, the cordial approbation and support of their Majesties and the Royal Family, his Grace the Duke of Bedford is anxious to introduce into Ireland, wholly free from religious proselytism, and which would powerfully accelerate those comprehensive and enlightened measures, to which another great friend to Ireland has, with uncommon promptitude and assiduity, obtained the assent of the Imperial Parliament;

MR. LANCASTER'S SCHOOL.

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I allude to that amiable and able statesman Sir John Newport, the present Chancellor of the Exchequer of Ireland.

May the happy effects of such a measure be as forcibly experienced in that country, as they have been in that which I am describing!

CHAPTER IV.

THE COINS-PRACTICE OF VAILS-GIVING IN HOLLAND-FRUIT AND VEGETABLE SELLERS-DUTCH PASSION FOR SCRUBBING AND MOPPING-WHIMSICAL SARCASM OF A TRAVELLER---SINGULAR OFFENCE OFFERED TO A CHAMBER-MAID---DUTCH PRINTS OF LORD NELSONTREATMENT OF OUR COUNTRYMEN AT VERDUN---DUTCH COMPARED WITH THE CHINESE-PRIVATE COLLECTIONS OF PAINTINGS-BRIEF ANECDOTE OF THE VANDERWERFS-REMARKS ON DUTCH AND FLEMISH SCHOOLS---DORPT---ANECDOTES OF DISTINGUISHED PERSONS THERE---ANECDOTE OF COWPER---INTERPOSITION OF PROVIDENCE.

IT is with great reluctance I approach

the subject of the currency of Holland, but as I hope to be read by some one who may hereafter visit that country, as much a stranger as I was to it, it is fit that I should not omit it; and I hereby apprize all my chairtravelling readers of my intention, that they may leap over my table of coins if they choose so to do.

SILVER COINS.

A doyt. Worth about half a farthing.

A stiver. About a penny at par. Twelve stivers are generally, but not in every part of Holland, considered equal to a shilling. This coin resembles a silver penny.

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Dubbeltje, or two stiver piece. This coin is very conve

nient small change.

A quarter guilder, or five stiver piece. This coin, I am very rare; I met with none of it.

told, is very rare ;

A zesthalven, or five stivers and four doyts. This is a

piece of base metal, and equal to an English sixpence; it is very convenient for an English traveller, on account of its precise value being known. Schellingen, of various kinds, the size of which determines the value, unless they are stamped.

Six and a half stiver piece. A silver piece, little larger than a sixpence, and the eighth part of a rix-dollar.. Eight stiver piece. A larger, but thinner piece than a schellingen, not much in circulation.

Ten stiver piece. Worth half a guilder, very scarce. Twelve and a half stiver piece. Not much in use. Thirteen stiver piece. A Zealand coin, and much in circulation.

A guilder or florin, or twenty stiver piece. The legitimate coin of Holland, by which they calculate, and is the best silver.

Twenty-four stiver piece, or half a rix-dollar.

Twenty-six stiver piece.

Twenty-eight stiver piece. There are many sorts of this

in Holland: it is usual to receive five in a lot, each of which is equal to seven guilders.

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Thirty stiver piece, or dollar. Of the value of half a

crown English, and about that size.

Thirty-one and a half stiver piece, or half a ducatoon. They are rare.

Forty stiver piece, or two guilder piece. Not common. Fifty stiver piece. The antient rix-dollar; not much in

use.

Fifty-two stiver piece, or modern rix-dollar. Much in circulation-in Amsterdam, and several other places, they will not pass for more than 50 or 51 stivers. In Zealand they are worth 53.

Sixty stiver piece, called a three guilder piece. Much

in use.

Sixty-three stiver piece, or ducatoon. Coined when the Spaniards were in the country.

GOLD COINS.

A ducat. A beautiful coin, of the purest fine gold. The Jews and the brokers generally deal in this coin, for which they receive two or three stivers profit on each. It is thin, and remarkably pleasant to the touch; and as a proof of its purity, it will bear to be frequently bent, without breaking. Upon almost every part of the continent this coin bears a premium, and is current throughout Europe.

A double ducat is ten guilders ten stivres.

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