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obliterated from our Annals, and forgotten in Europe. He is of Opinion, that it would have been much better for Mr D'Anvers's Purpose to have given the following Relation, had it occurr'd to him.

While the Rev. Bafil Kennet was A Chaplain to the English Factory at Leghorn, tho' they exercised their Religion with the utmost Caution and Privacy, he met with great Oppofition from the Papifis, and was in great Danger of the Inquiliti un: They had given fecret Orders to apprehend him, and hurry him away to Pifa, and to difpofe of him in the fevereft Manner. Upon Notice of this Defign,

Dr Newton, the English Envoy at Florence, interpofed his Offices at that Court; but could obtain no other Answer, than that he might fend for the English Preacher, and keep him in his own Family as his domestic Chaplain; otherwife, he must take the Confequence; for in religious Matters the Court of Inquifition was fu perior to all Civil Powers. The Envoy communicated this Answer to the Earl of Sunderland, then principal Secretary of State to our ever to be remember'd Queen, ANNE the GREAT. In her Majefty's Name, he immediately return'd the following Directions:

"SIR, yours of the 16th and 24th I "received: In anfwer to which, I have "laid the whole Affair before her Maje

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and Armies, that Mr Kennet escaped their
intended Fury, and continued for feveral
Years to officiate as a Minister of the
Church of England, in a large Room, fet
apart for a Chapel, in the Conful's Houfe,
with publick Prayers, and a Courfe of
Sermons, fince publifhed to the World.
See the Life of Mr Kennet, in the
General Dictionary. Vol. VI.

From The meekip Milcellany, N° 317.
Narrative of the Death of the Hon. Fr.
Nt, Son to the late-

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T 16 he was fent to the University -, perfect in Latin and Greek, where he continued 5 Years, and bebaved fo agreeably to his religious Education, that he was looked upon a Bleffing and Ornament to his Family. At 21 he came to Town, and enter'd himself at to ftudy the Law.

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His new Acquaintance began to rally him for his Religion: To whom he would fay, Gentlemen, you, who pretend to reafon, can't think Laughter a conclufive Argument. If Religion ⚫ be fo abfurd as you would have me beD' lieve, why don't you give some fair Reasons against it?” This fome of them would attempt, and tho' their Argument at first was as unfuccessful as their Raillery, yet the Poifon funk by Degrees, fty, who has commanded me to order and at last tainted him as deeply as themyou to tell the Great Duke and his Mi- felves. He was adopted into their So nifters, in her Majefty's Name, That if ciety, which met to lay down Rules, for E "there be any Moleftation given to her being fo Critically Wicked, that the Law Chaplain refiding at Leghorn, fhe fhall fhould not be able to take hold of them. look upon it as an Affront done to herself " and the Nation, a Breach of Peace, and a Violation of the Law of Nations; and fhall, by her Fleets and Armies, which "will be all the Year in the Mediterranean

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He had too much Prudence to lay himfelf open; he ftill kept a fair Correfpondence with his Friends, and in ftrange Places was fober and reserved. But in fecret, and among his Acquaintance, as wicked, as Good-Parts, Abundance of Temptations, and a fair Estate enabled him to be.

On Nov. 30, 1692, he was taken ill, and found, notwithstanding all his Precautions, he had not yet thook off the Expectation of another Life. This made him throw himself upon his Bed, and break into thefe Expreffions: Whence 'this War in my Breast? What Argu

ment is there now to affift me against • Matter of Fa&? Do I affert that there ' is no Hell, while I feel one in my Bofom? • Am I certain there is no After-Retribution, when I feel a prefent Judgment s Do I affirm my Soul to be as moral as my Body, when this languifhes, and that is vigorous as ever? O that or one could reftore to me my an Guard of Piety and Innocence! W

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that I am, whither fhall I fly from this Breaft? What will become of me?"

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One of his old Companions coming in here faid, How now, Brother? why this melancholy Look and Posture? What's the Matter? The Matter? reply'd he. 'Tis you, and your Companions, have intill'd your Principles into me, which A now when I have molt need of them leave me in Confufion and Defpair. What Advice or Comfort have you now to fortify me with against the fearful Expectations of another Life? Are you certain that the Soul is Material and Mortal, and that it will diflolve with the Body?" So certain, reply'd the other, that I venture my Whole upon it. Here I interrupted them by coming into the Room; and applying myself to the fick Perfon, told him that I was a Stranger to him, but hearing of his Illnefs, I thought it my Duty to offer him what Service I was capable of.' 'Ithank you, faid he, and wou'd defire you to C engage that Gentleman who fits there, and prove to him the Soul is not Matter nor Mortal.' That. faid I, is easily I prov'd; Matter is univerfally allow'd to be indifferent to Motion or Reft: That if it be in Reft, it will reft to all Eternity, unless fomething elfe moves it; and if it be in Motion, it will eternally D move, unless fomething elfe ftops it. Now you, who think the Soul Matter, fay that it first moves the Animal Spirits, they the Nerves, thefe the Limbs. But to fay this, is to fay that Matter moves itfelf, which is abfurd, and contrary to the Maxim juft mention'd. Therefore the Soul is not Matter, and "confequently not liable to be diffolv'd as E

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is Matter.'

The fick Gentleman answered only with a Groan, whilft his Friend made hafte out of the Room. I was furpriz'd at fuch an Effect, and defired to know the Reafon of his Difcontent, whom he left with me. Alas, Sir, faid he, you have undeceived me now 'tis too late; I was afraid of nothing fo much as the * Immortality of the Soul. Now you have affured me of that, you have af* certained me of a Hell, and of a Portion among those who have apoftatiz'd from their Religion. You have now feal'd my Damnation, by giving me an Earnest of it; I mean, an awaken'd Confcience, G that brings my Sins into my Remembrance, by reckoning up the nume rous Catalogue, for which I must go and give Account. O Apoftate Wretch from what Hopes art thou fal en !O

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that I had never known what Religion. was. Then I had never denied my Saviour, nor been fo black an Heir of Perdition.' I ftood fpeechlefs some time at thefe ftrange Expreflions, but fu foon as I could recollect myfelf, faid, Sir, I wou'd defire you would take care how you violate the Mercy of God, and think fo flight of the Sufferings of Christ, as if they were not fufficient for the Redemption of the greateft Sinner. This may be a Delusion of the Devil's. If you are convinc'd the Soul is immortal, I hope 'tis to a good End. If you had died ignorant of it, you had been miferably undeceived in another World. Now you have fome Time to prepare for your Welfare. To which he replied.

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As to the Mercies of God in Chrift. 'I once knew and tafted what they are; which is now part of my Curfe, in that 'I am now fenfible of my Lofs. They are, I grant you, fufficient for those who have any Share in them. But what's that to me, who have denied Chrift? who have daily crucified him afrefli, and put him to an open Shame? The ⚫ Devil has nothing to do with the Torture I undergo. 'Tis no Delufion of his, but the juit Judgment of God And your Convictions are also part of my heavy Judgment in that you have given me a fenfible Horror of my Sin, by proving my Soul Immortal. Had I gone ftrait to Hell in my old Opinion, I had endur'd but one Hell, whereas "I now feel two: I mean, not only an inexpreffible Torture which I carry in my Breaft, but an Expectation of I know not what Change. O that I were in Hell that I might feel the worst! And yet I dread to die, because the worst will never have an End.,

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All this he spoke with fo much Eagernefs, and fuch an Air of Horror as is fcarce to be imagin'd. He was now got to Bed, refuling all Suftenance, and exceedingly fweating thro' the Extremity of his Torments. Before I took my Leave, I defired to pray by him, which with much Reluctance he confented to. In the midst of Prayer, he groan'd extremely, toffing himself as if he were in the Agonies of Death. When Prayer was over, I ask'd him the Reafon of it. He answer'd, As the Damn'd in Hell, who lift up their Eyes in Torments, and behold a far off the Saints in Abraham's Bolom, have their Torments thereby doubled, firft by reflecting on the Mifery they are in, and fecondly, by obferving the Happiness they have loft: So I, knowing myfelf to be harden'd, and feal'd

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unto Damnation, hearing the Prayers of the Righteous, to which God's Ears are always open: This increafes my Torment, to think how I am excluded from 'fuch a Privilege, and have no other Portion left me, than Blafpheming, Weeping, and Wailing, and Gnafhing of Teeth for ever.' Pray, Sir, faid I, confider there's a vaft Difference between you and them that are in Hell. They are loft irrecoverably for evermore, without any Opportunity of Reprieve, or Hope of Pardon : You are yet alive, and have Promifes belonging to you in common with other Sinners; Chrift died for Sinners, and God has fworn by himself,

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that no one in the Room could forbear weeping, which he perceiving, faid, And can ye weep at the Image and bare Relation of the Effects of God's Wrath? What then do I fuffer, who actually lie under the very Weight of his Fury? ReAfrain your Tears for me, 'tis in vain Pity is no Debt to me. Nothing is fo proper for me as fome Curfe to compleat my Mifery, and free me from the Torment of Expectation.' Here he paufed a little, then looking toward the Fire, he faid, O that I was to lie and broil upon that Fire a hundred thou'fand Years, to purchase the Favour of 'God, and be reconciled to him again. But 'tis a fruitless Wifh! Millions of 'Millions of Years will bring me no 'nearer to the End of my Tortures than one poor Hour! O Eternity! Eternity! "Who can discover the Abyss of Eternity Who can properly paraphrafe on thofe Words for Ever and Ever.'

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fhould't pour out full Vials of Wrath upon me! O thou would't let go thine Hand, for ever forget me, and let me fall into my first Nothing! As my Righte oufnefs could have profited thee Nothing, fo my Impieties can have done thee no Hurt! therefore annihilate me, and let me perish! Be not angry with me that I thus expoftulate thee; 'twill be but a little Time, before thy Wrath shall force the dreafulleft Blafphemies from me. O! that thou would't take away my Being, or Mifery; neither of them can encrease or diminish thy Happiness, and therefore let them both cease, and let my Name be known no more: Or if I must be, and be immortal, and thou wilt punish me because I have defpis'd thee, let a Privation of Thought fuffice, and let me pafs my Eternity in a Dream, without ever being waken'd by the C Pangs of Torment, or by the gnawing of the Worm that never dies! But Ŏ fruitless Defires! I am expoftulating ⚫ with a God that has for ever fhut out my Prayers, and only protracts my Breath a little longer, to make me an Example ⚫ unto others. O ye Kocks and Mountains, that ye would hide me from the D Wrath of an incens'd God! But I cannot ⚫ flee from his Prefence; what he hath begun he will finish! He will extend his • Wrath against me for ever and ever.' Here fome one knock'd at the Door, and it proved the Postman with a Letter for him, which being told him, 'How, faid E he, a Letter for me? A little longer, and I expect another fort of Meflenger: "I am very quickly to give up my Accounts of every fecret Action I ́haye done, and I have a Mind to make an Experiment to fee how I can bear it: Pray, Sir, added he to me, do me the Favour to read this Letter. The Contents I know not, but I fufpect it comes from fome of my old Acquaintance.' I defired to be excufed, aliedging that there might be fomething in it, improper to be divulg'd. Nothing, reply'd he, can af'fect me now; I have no Honour, no Reputation, and what's yet worfe, no G Heaven to lofe, by this, or any other Act. Upon this I broke it open and

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[To be continued.] P.59.

Universal Spectatoz, Jan. 13. N° 536.

to gain Admiration: But from what other Caufe can it be that my Lord Jehu wears a Plush Frock, a little narrow-edg'd Lac'd Hat, a colour'd Handkerchief, and in this Habit drives a motley Sett of Horfes, and a Coach of his own, built by his A own Directions, in humble Imitation of those which carry Paflengers on the Road; it is the Knowledge of his own Abilities which dictates this Condu&: How pleafing is the Reflection to him, that when he goes thro' a Country Town, fitting with becoming Grace in his Box, he hears the People fay, There goes my Lord Jehu. His great Abilities in Driving, his Exactnefs of Similitude in Drefs, and his Affability to his Brethren of the Whip, muft give his Lordship a fenfible Satisfaction, that this Particularity makes him as well known in moft Roads throughout England, as the honeft Fellows themfelves who drive the Stages. I will not undertake to fay, whether it is in Imitation of his Lordship, or whether the Product of their own fertile Genius's, but I have lately obferv'd a great Number of fmart young Fellows, drefs'd in the Manner of my Lord;, a narrow-edg'd Hat flapp'd down, a plain Shirt, Buckskin-Breeches, and an India Handkerchief round the Neck, feem to conftitute the Character of a pretty Fellow. There are another Sett of Sparks who chufe rather to appear as Jockeys, and it is feldom or never they are to be feen without Boots, Whips in their Hands, and Black Caps inftead of Hats. Another Clafs of thefe Gentry difguife themfelves in Rxg and Duffel Coats, which it feems are politely term'd Wrap-Rascals; and in fhort, dark Wigs, and dirty Lin nen, chuse rather to appear like Pickpockets than Gentlemen. My Country Readers may wonder that I should inftance these Perfons as Examples of Ambition; but they will allow them to be Candidates for publick Notice, when I inform them that in thefe Habits they ap pear with a Kind of Pride in all the publick Places about Town: They have at laft carry'd it fo far, that in thofe Drefles they come into the Boxes at the Theatres; and where one would expect to fee a gen teel polite Circle, we view Ladies of the firit Quality and Distinction, furrounded by a Parcel of Men who look like Stage. Coachmen, Jockeys and Pick-pockets.

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HERE is at prefent a reigning H Ambition among our young Gentlemen, of degrading themselves in their Apparel to the Clafs of the Servants they keep. It may at first feem very extraor dinary that thefe Sparkshould act thus

As this Manner of Drefs is accompany'd vife thefe young Sparks not to have fo with as rude a Manner of Behaviour, I adgreat a Defire of being diftinguished for the Oddity of their Appearance; but inftead of that ardent Emulation they fhew to imitate the inferior Clafs of Mankind,

they

they would exert their rational Faculties, and endeavour to feem, as well by their Habit as Converfation, Men of Common Senfe and Common Good Manners.

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Refentment and Indignation; and that is, our being fo frequently taken into Service, and every now and then difcharg'd, with fo little Regard and DecenA cy, that we are not ufed even with common Humanity. Thefe Hardships which I have too often feen and fuffered, and the Inconveniencies of which 1 at this Time labour under, have led me to reflect on the little Encouragement given to the Navy, compar'd with the Advantages attending the Land-Service,

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OBSERVATIONS on the Foregoing. T is a common Obfervation, that Authority is of no Advantage, without Spirit to exert it. The Spectatorial Prerogative feems, in the Hands of this Writer, to be like the wooden Sword of Harlequin, neither able to raife Terror, nor give Wounds, nor of any other Úfe than to make its Mafter ridiculous. Why should he top short without telling those contemptible Reptiles the Opinion every Beholder entertains of them. The Writer, to whom he imprudently makes himfelf related, would have apply'd the Ridi-C culum with the Acri. He would have expofed the true Reafons of their appearing fo drefs'd; one oblig'd to it by an ill Run, and ill Judgment in Gaming, another by his Debaucheries and Excefs; the warmly muffled up young Knight, at that Time, had renewed his Acquaintance with a Fellow Collegian, who practifed Phylic; a third intending an Intrigue with one of the Orange Wenches, and the others, as meer ftupid Imitators, who, tho' incapable, unlefs by dreffing to their Fortunes, of making any tolerable Appearance, are fo fenfelefs as to neglect it. He would have advised the thin-fac'd Gentleman, with the Cape-Coat, Whip and Boots, to have acquired a little ruddy Complexion, to hide the Impofture: And the like Strokes, which the Reader may better conceive than I defcribe. Thus it would appear that every one of thefe Of fenders ought to be remark'd, not for Negligence only, but either for Want of common Understanding or Want of Occonomy; Want of Credit, or Want of a healthy Conftitution; betides the Want of good Breeding, in thus introducing Pickpockets and Scou drels into the Boxes, and in contemning the Law of the Land, which forbids going disguised.

Common enfe, Jan. 20. N° 103. Mr COMMON SENSE,

Have belong'd to the Sea-Service above

That our Fleets are the Honour, the Defence, the Strength of Great Britain, the Support of our Trade, the Dependance of our Friends, and the Terror of our Enemies, nobody will difpute: And yet the Perfons to whom these great Advantages are owing, are confidered in the moit mean and defpicable Light. When a Man has spent all the best of his Time in the Dangers and Hardships a Sea Life is always expofed to, and has all the Succefs as to Preferment which that Service allows, the greatest Reward he can hope for as a Recompence for his Labours is (as a Commiflioner or a Flag) an Appointment of five or fix hundred Pounds a Year; and that only for ten or a Dozen Perfons out of fo great a Number, who every one are worthy of better Preferment. But what is all this to the Number and Salaries of Colonels (to defcend E no lower) Brigadiers, Major-Generals, Lieutenant-Generals, Governors of Edi burgh, Portmouth, Plymouth, Hill, Gibraltar, Port-Mahon, and all the flands, Caftles, Forts, &c. of lefs Confideration? Add to all this, the Court Preferments enjoy'd by the Gentlemen of the Army; p as Secretary of State, Gentlemen of the Bed-Chamber, Equerries, Pages of Ho nour, and fo on. Whereas there are not three People belonging to the Sea Scrvice, who have any other Preferment in the whole Adminiftration than their Polts in the Navy, or relating to it. I will be bold to fay, that one Man now in Employment, by multiplying Preferments, has an Income double to what the Salaries of all the Admirals join'd toge ther at this Time amount to. A Stranger that should obferve this, would believe that it is the Army that is the Strength and Honour of the Nation, that it is They who defend our Trade, and awe our Encmies, and not the Fleet.

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five and thirty Years, have been in feven Engagements, five Times wound-H ed, and once taken Prifoner. The Sufferings I mention I think of with Pleasure, and am willing to ferve my Country with the latt Drop of my Bio d. But fome Hard/hips of another Nature, which we Scamen have of late Years been fub. ject to, I cannot but exprefs with fome

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