An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of the Understanding, Bind 1–3

Forsideomslag
Mundell, 1801 - 308 sider

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Indhold

II
3
IV
8
VI
29
VIII
51
X
72
XII
89
XIV
91
XVI
93
LXII
122
LXIV
131
LXVI
134
LXVII
138
LXIX
151
LXXI
160
LXXII
171
LXXIV
207

XVII
98
XIX
99
XXI
103
XXIII
115
XXV
122
XXVI
129
XXVIII
138
XXIX
141
XXXI
158
XXXIII
175
XXXV
185
XXXVI
190
XXXVII
206
XXXIX
209
XL
212
XLII
217
XLIV
275
XLV
3
XLVI
11
XLVIII
36
L
37
LI
43
LII
48
LIII
71
LV
87
LVI
97
LVIII
100
LX
111
LXXV
210
LXXVII
212
LXXIX
229
LXXX
249
LXXXII
iii
LXXXIII
3
LXXXV
9
LXXXVII
18
LXXXIX
45
XCI
58
XCII
65
XCIII
79
XCIV
99
XCVI
110
XCVII
111
XCIX
124
CI
134
CII
147
CIV
149
CVI
151
CVII
155
CIX
167
CX
190
CXI
200
CXII
210
CXIV
225
CXVI
229

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Populære passager

Side 250 - ... harangues and popular addresses, they are certainly, in all discourses that pretend to inform or instruct, wholly to be avoided ; and, where truth and knowledge are concerned, cannot but be thought a great fault either of the language or person 'that makes use of them.
Side 264 - This is that which I think great readers are apt to be mistaken in. Those who have read of everything are thought to understand everything too; but it is not always so. Reading furnishes the mind only with materials of knowledge; it is thinking makes what we read ours.
Side 47 - It is evident the mind knows not things immediately, but only by the intervention of the ideas it has of them. Our knowledge therefore is real only so far as there is a conformity between our ideas and the reality of things.
Side 140 - ... do not appear to me to have lost the faculty of reasoning ; but having joined together some ideas very wrongly, they mistake them for truths, and they err as men do that argue right from wrong principles.
Side 9 - It shall suffice to my present purpose to consider the discerning faculties of a man as they are employed about the objects which they have to do with...
Side 145 - When therefore we quit particulars, the generals that rest are only creatures of our own making, their general nature being nothing but the capacity they are put into by the understanding of signifying or representing many particulars. For the signification they have is nothing but a relation that by the mind of man is added to them.
Side 133 - That which thus captivates their reasons, and leads men of sincerity blindfold from common sense, will, when examined, be found to be what we are speaking of; some independent ideas, of no alliance to one another, are by education, custom, and the constant din of their party, so coupled in their minds, that they always appear there together; and they can no more separate them in their thoughts, than if they were but one idea, and they operate as if they were so.
Side 227 - So that the idea of liberty is the idea of a power in any agent to do or forbear any particular action, according to the determination or thought of the mind, whereby either of them is preferred to the other...
Side 18 - But whether there be anything more than barely that idea in our minds, whether we can thence certainly infer the existence of anything without us which corresponds to that idea, is that whereof some men think there may be a question made; because men may have such ideas in their minds when no such thing exists, no such object affects their senses.
Side 139 - If it may be doubted, whether beasts compound and enlarge their ideas that way, to any degree: this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt man and brutes; and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to.

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