Readings in the History of Education: A Collection of Sources and Readings to Illustrate the Development of Educational Practice, Theory, and Organization, Del 1

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Houghton Mifflin, 1920 - 684 sider

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A PAGE OF THE ÆNEID OF VERGIL 6 M TULLIUS CICERO 10643 B C
37
Privileges granted to Physicians and Teachers
39
Effect of the Persecutions
47
Catechumenal Schools of the Early Church
53
The Copying of Books at a Monastery
54
A MONK IN A SCRIPTORIUM
58
Enforcing Lenten Reading in the Monasteries
59
The Hunting Germans and their Fighting Ways
65
3
76
Work of a Monk in writing and copying Books
78
Work of a Nun in copying Books
80
Scarcity and Cost of Books
82
Anathemas to protect Books from Theft
83
On Education in Early England a The Learning of Theodore b Theodores Work for the English Churches c How Albinus succeeded Abbot Hadrian ...
84
85
85
On sending out a Collection of Edited Sermons
88
General Proclamations as to Education
89
a The Proclamation of 787 A D
90
b The Proclamation of 789 A D
91
ALFRED THE GREAT
94
NinthCentury Plan of the Monastery at Saint Gall
97
NINTHCENTURY PLAN OF THE MONASTERY OF SAINT GALL SWITZERLAND
98
EDUCATION DURING THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES II SCHOOLS ESTABLISHED AND INSTRUCTION PROVIDED
99
77
100
INTERIOR OF A NORMAN SCHOOL TWELFTH CENTURY
101
The Episcopal and Monastic Schools
102
A SCHOOL OF MENDICANT MONKS
103
The School of Salisbury Cathedral 73 Aldwincle Foundation Grant for a Chantry School
105
The Seven Liberal Arts
106
A LESSON IN LOGIC
108
A MEDIEVAL SCHOOL
111
A Medieval Latin Colloquy 76 Quintilian On the Importance of Grammar
113
The Elements and the Planets a of the Elements
115
A TenthCentury Schoolmasters Books
116
The Truce of God 80 Gautier How the Church used Chivalry
120
INFLUENCES TENDING TOWARD A REVIVAL OF LEARN ING Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
127
99
128
The Moslem Civilization in Spain
129
Learning among the Moslems of Spain
131
Works of Aristotle known by 1300 A D
135
On Aristotles Greatness
136
How Aristotle was received at Oxford
137
How Aristotle was received at Paris a Decree of Church Council 1210 A D
138
Abélards Sic et Non a From the Introduction
139
The Great Work of the Schoolmen
140
The Early Mediæval Town a To the Eleventh Century
142
A TYPICAL MEDIEVAL TOWN
143
b By the Thirteenth Century
144
An English Town Charter
145
Oath of a New Freeman in a Medieval Town
146
Ordinances of the WhiteTawyers Guild
147
Report on School of Guild of Saint Nicholas
149
An Indenture of Apprenticeship
150
100
152
106
153
Table of Dates of University Foundations before 1600
154
Privileges for Students who travel for Study
156
Privileges granted the Students at Paris
157
Charter of the University of Heidelberg
159
Exemption of Masters and Students from Taxation at Paris
162
Cost to a City of maintaining a University
164
III
165
Early Licensing of Professors to teach
166
A University License to teach
167
113
168
Books required for the Arts Degree
169
THE CAMP OF WISDOM
170
Educational Influences of the Church Services 82 Winchester Statutes How the Church urged that the Ele ments of Religious Education be given
171
116
172
117
174
On the Teaching of Theology
175
120
177
123
179
124
182
A LECTURE at a MediævaL UNIVERSITY 22 A UNIVERSITY DISPUTATION
183
125
186
Boccaccios Visit to the Library of Monte Cassino
188
BOCCACCIO 131375
189
A COPIED MANUSCRIPT
192
Founding of the Ducal Library at Urbino
194
The New Taste for Books
201
GUARINO DA VERONA 13741460
205
On the Nature of Education
210
Statement of the Aim and Purpose of Education
211
His Program for Study
212
JOHN COLET 14651519
214
AN ENGLISH SCHOOL
219
GRANTHAM FREE GRAMMAR SCHOOL
221
A SOUTHEUROPEAN FIFTEENTHCENTURY SCHOOL
224
THE REVOLT AGAINST AUTHORITY
226
ReFoundation of Cathedral School at Canterbury
267
182
272
The Prussian Elementary Teacher and his Training
278
EDUCATIONAL Results of the Protestant Revolt
285
192
286
The Massachusetts Law of 1647
299
Rules regulating a Schoolmaster
305
205
316
How he arrived at the Theory he set forth
321
214
328
Bequest for Sevenoaks Grammar School 217
329
Discontent of the Nobility with the Schools 214 Montaigne Ridicule of the Humanistic Pedants 215 Montaigne His Conception of Education 216 Loc...
348
Sample Pages from the Orbis Pictus 222 Butler Place of Comenius in the History of Education 223 Gesner Need for Realschulen for the New Classes t...
355
Table of Contents of his Positions
360
238
361
On the Teaching of Latin
364
Two Early Spelling Books 230 Webster Description of PreRevolutionary Schools 231 Raumer Teachers in Gotha in 1741
369
An EighteenthCentury Swedish Peoples School 233 Raumer Schools of FrankfurtamMain in Eighteenth Cen tury 234 Krüsi A Swiss Teachers Examin...
370
a Books proper to be used in CharitySchools b Lewiss Exposition of the Christian Catechism
381
A CharitySchool Subscription Form
383
The CharitySchool of Saint Johns Parish
384
THE EIGHTEENTH A TRANSITION CENTURY
392
253
393
Kilpatr Jork of the Dutch in developing Schools
408
The Farreaching Influence of Rousseaus Writings
409
An EighteenthCentury Indenture of Apprentice ship
415
Work of the National Convention in France
416
267
429
An Estimate of Pestalozzis Work
444
274
455
278
456
289
490
Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
499
CharitySchool Education described
514
The Duke of Newcastle Commission Report
532
AWAKENING AN EDUCATIONAL CONSCIOUSNESS IN THE UNITED STATES
542
The Schools of Boston about 17901815
543
The ElementarySchool System in 1823
558
THE AMERICAN BATTLE FOR FREE STATE SCHOOLS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
561
The Ground of the FreeSchool System
562
Repeal of the Connecticut School Law
565
On the Repeal of the Connecticut School Law 319 Gulliver The Struggle for Free Schools in Norwich Connecti
566
The State and Education
567
A RateBill and a Warrant for Collection
573
On Religious Instruction in the Schools 323 Michigan Petition for a Division of the School Funds 324 Michigan CounterPetition against Division 573
575
Act of Incorporation of Norwich Free Academy
579
Establishment of the First American High School 327 Boston The SecondarySchool System in 1823
580
The Basic Documents of Japanese Education 333 Switzerland Constitutional Provisions as to Education and Religious Freedom
594
a Preamble to the Education Code of 1872
595
The Transformation of China by Education
597
The Recent Progress of Science
600
Scientific Knowledge must precede Invention
603
Lack of Intercommunication illustrated
604
The Struggle for National Realization
605
The French Teacher and the National Spirit
608
The German Emphasis on National Ends
612
Landing of the Pilgrims at Manilla
614
NEW CONCEPTIONS OF THE EDUCATIONAL PRO CESS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
617
The German Seminaries for Teachers
618
A German Teachers Seminary described
619
A French Normal School described
621
Beginnings of Teacher Training in England
623
The PupilTraining System described
626
Recommendations for TeacherTraining Schools
627
Organizing the First State Normal Schools a The Organizing Law
628
Importance of the Normal School
630
Examples of Instruction from a Davenport History of the United States
631
Elements of Geography Map
632
Elements of Geography Text
633
The Elementary Schools of Berlin in 1838
634
Grading the Schools of
636
Herbarts Educational Ideas
639
Herbarts Ideas applied
641
Herbart and Modern Psychology
644
Froebels Educational Views
645
English and German Universities contrasted
648
MidNineteenth Century Elementary Education in England
651
MidNineteenth Century Secondary Education in England
653
What Knowledge is of Most Worth?
655
Conclusions as to the Importance of Science
659
The Old and New Psychology contrasted
661
Difficulties in Transforming the School a Relating Education to Life
663
b The Old Teacher and the New System
664
NEW TENDENCIES AND EXPANSIONS Introduction to the Readings of the Chapter
667
The Environmental Influence of the State
668
German Secondary Schools and Ger man National Needs
669
The University and the State
672
tion
675
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Side 331 - The end, then, of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest perfection.
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Side 534 - It shall not be required as a condition of any child being admitted into or continuing in the school, that he shall attend or abstain from attending any Sunday school, or any place of religious worship, or that he shall attend any religious observance or any instruction in religious subjects in the school or elsewhere...
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Side 425 - It shall be the duty of the General Assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide, by law, for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation from township schools to a State University, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
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