Some New Literary Valuations

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Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1908 - 411 sider

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Side 82 - If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men will be fitted to it; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear, every hope will forward it; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty current in human affairs, will appear rather to resist the decrees of Providence itself, than the mere designs of men. They will not be resolute and firm, but perverse and obstinate.
Side 145 - We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodical fits of morality. In general, elopements, divorces, and family quarrels, pass with little notice. We read the scandal, talk about it for a day, and forget it. But once in six or seven years our virtue becomes outrageous. We cannot suffer the laws of religion and decency to be violated. We must make a stand against vice. We must teach libertines, that the English people appreciate the importance of domestic ties.
Side 109 - And yet, steeped in sentiment as she lies, spreading PREFACE. xi her gardens to the moonlight, and whispering from her towers the last enchantments of the Middle Age, who will deny that Oxford, by her ineffable charm, keeps ever calling us nearer to the true goal of all of us, to the ideal, to perfection...
Side 165 - Far off; — anon her mate comes winging back From hunting, and a great way off descries His huddling young left sole; at that, he checks His pinion, and with short uneasy sweeps Circles above his eyry...
Side 340 - No more firing was heard at Brussels — the pursuit rolled miles away. Darkness came down on the field and city : and Amelia was praying for George, who was lying on his face, dead, with a bullet through his heart.
Side 82 - It has given me many anxious moments for the last two years. If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men will be fitted to it; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear. every hope will forward it; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty...
Side 254 - and all such rebels!" with his most judicial frown. But, Virginians, don't do it! for I tell you that the flagon, Filled with blood of Old Brown's offspring, was first poured by Southern hands; And each drop from Old Brown's life-veins, like the red gore of the dragon, May spring up a vengeful Fury, hissing through your slave- worn lands! And Old Brown, Osawatomie Brown, May trouble you more than ever, when you've nailed his coffin down!
Side 254 - JOHN BROWN in Kansas settled, like a steadfast Yankee farmer, Brave and godly, with four sons — all stalwart men of might. There he spoke aloud for Freedom, and the Border-strife grew warmer, Till the Rangers fired his dwelling, in his absence, in the night ; And Old Brown, Osawatomie Brown, Came homeward in the morning — to find his house burned down.
Side 168 - By sandy Bahrein, in the Persian Gulf, Plunging all day in the blue waves, at night, Having made up his tale of precious pearls, Rejoins her in their hut upon the sands — So dear to the pale Persians Eustum came.
Side 215 - To rest beneath the clover sod, That takes the sunshine and the rains, Or where the kneeling hamlet drains The chalice of the grapes of God...

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