An Adventure in Moral Philosophy

Forsideomslag
Methuen, 1926 - 276 sider
0 Anmeldelser
Anmeldelserne verificeres ikke af Google, men Google tjekker indholdet og fjerner det, hvis det er falsk.

Fra bogen

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 251 - Brief and powerless is man's life ; on him and all his race the slow sure doom falls pitiless and dark. Blind to good and evil, reckless of destruction, omnipotent matter rolls on its relentless way; for Man, condemned to-day to lose his dearest, to-morrow himself to pass through the gate of darkness, it remains only to cherish, ere yet the blow falls, the lofty thoughts that ennoble his little day...
Side 251 - Blind to good and evil, reckless of destruction, omnipotent matter rolls on its relentless way; for Man, condemned to-day to lose his dearest, to-morrow himself to pass through the gate of darkness, it remains only to cherish, ere yet the blow falls, the lofty; thoughts that ennoble his little day; disdaining the coward| terrors of the slave of Fate, to worship at the shrine that his own hands have built; undismayed by the empire of chance, to preserve a mind free from the wanton tyranny that rules...
Side 160 - I have just said, is objective — and it is objectively an experience — so far as it is critical ; and this means that it is cognizant — objectively cognizant — of other experiences. Now when the term "objective" is used by philosophers and men of science it is likely to suggest a set of rules formulated on behalf of logic or of scientific method. But these rules are nothing but more or less ineffectual attempts to define the experience of objectivity ; an experience suggested more directly...
Side 99 - For the essence of humanism is that one belief of which he seems never to have doubted, that nothing which has ever interested living men and women can wholly lose its vitality — no language they have spoken nor oracle by which they have hushed their voices, no dream which has once been entertained by actual human minds, nothing about which they have ever been passionate or expended time and zeal, (pp.
Side 180 - I have thought it best to reprint it here, with some slight changes which bring it closer to my original meaning. I have dealt more fully in Marius the Epicurean with the thoughts suggested by it.
Side 273 - For the essence of humanism is that belief of which he seems never to have doubted, that nothing which has ever interested living men and women can wholly lose its vitality — no language they have spoken, nor oracle beside which they have hushed their voices, no dream which has once been entertained by actual human minds, nothing about which they have ever been passionate, or expended time and zeal.
Side 257 - I firmly disbelieve, myself, that our human experience is the highest form of experience extant in the universe. I believe rather that we stand in much the same relation to the whole of the universe as our canine and feline pets do to the whole of human life. They inhabit our drawingrooms and libraries.
Side 250 - To anyone who has tried to live in sympathy with the Greek philosophers, the suggestion that they were " intellectualists " must seem ludicrous. On the contrary, Greek philosophy is based on the faith that reality is divine, and that the one thing needful is for the soul, which is akin to the divine, to enter into communion with it. It was in truth an effort to satisfy what we call the religious instinct.
Side 90 - We are in a non-moral condition whenever we want anything intensely", ie, absolutely, so as to limit the possibilities of choice. So far I follow him ; and I should take this to mean that a man's life is imperfectly moral so far as he sacrifices any part of himself past or present. But now it seems, as I understand Professor Dewey (and I will not claim to understand him finally), that for him morality does consist precisely in the constant sacrifice of the past — to the future or to the present....
Side 104 - Let me have men about me that are fat, Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o' nights. Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much; such men are dangerous.

Bibliografiske oplysninger