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possible to publish it before October next. In the mean time it is my intention to examine the building again; as in the progress of arranging my MSS. for the press, I have met with many difficulties, some of which I hope you will excuse me in stating, as they are particularly applicable to the object of your Magazine; and will shew that even local historians are not always sufficient, or to be relied on, for the account of a particular building. Barrett, in his History of Bristol, 4to, 1789, has so confounded fact and fable, the deceptive fabrications of Chatterton, with genuine records, that it is difficult to discriminate be tween the two *. Sceptical in such cases, I have not admitted one statement of the Bristol Historian, without reference to some better authority: and on the most essential points it is not easy to obtain satisfactory documents. The following extract from Barrett's History, p. 566, is a proof of his credulity: From "Au Old Velium Role" in his own possession, he quotes this passage as a document of the date alluded to: "The auntyaunte gate of Saynte Marye ybuylden by Kynge Bythrycus in the year DCCXXXXXXXXIX; as it stooden in daies of Edwarde Confessoure;" is preserved in a rude drawing, being embattled at top, and adorned with two shields with a cross patée on each side of the window, and the same on each side of the top of the arch, where was to be seen the foot of a portcullis to let down."

Though there cannot be much question about the origin of this "Old Vellum Role," yet I must acknowledge that it would gratify me to see it. Barrett is not the only author whose statements are doubtful; for Walpole, in his Works, vol. III. p. 46, has printed an account of an ancient Sepulchre, &c. which he says is extracted from "the Minutes of the Antiquarian Society for the year 1736." On referring to those Minutes no such account appears. It is in

* Barrett gave credit to, and admitted as historical evidence, the fabrications of Chatterton: Whitaker, in his History of Manchester, was also a betiever in Ossian. Hence it becomes

very necessary, for Topographers of the present times to exert a little rationality and scepticism..

serted with variations in Barrett's History, and in the "Nuge Antiquæ." Mr. Park, in his notes to the latter work, says this paper was not made public till after Chatterton's death. It will be curious to ascertain the origin of this presumed document; for, if spurious, it will impeach the antiquarian sagacity of Walpole, who displayed so much exultation in detecting some of poor Chatterton's fictions. It is my intention to investigate this, and other doubtful points: but, as I may fail in several, I make free to suggest the following queries and remarks to your Antiquarian Readers and Correspondents, and shall feel much obliged by answers to any part of them.

Barrett often refers to documents and records in his own possession; Qu. In whose possession are these at the present time? and what are the evidences of their authenticity?

What has become of the parchments and MSS. formerly found in the North porch of Redcliffe Church? and were not some of them genuine documents, respecting the building, endowing, furnishing, repairing, &c. of the said Church?

Where are Hobson's MSS. to be found? Barrett refers to them, p. 567. He also quotes" the Mayor's Calen dar" for the year 1376, the existence and custody of which I am desirous of ascertaining.

What is the earliest date, and are there any entries in the "Old Chronicles of Bristol, in the City chamber?” Is Canyng's Will to be seen, and where?

Are there any entries respecting him in the Register at Wesbury; or any remains of his College?

In p. 576 Barrett says that Mr. Morgan had many curious parchments relating to Mr. " Canynges and the church of Redclive."-Åre these still extant?

In an old plan of Redcliffe Church I find reference to a Stone Cross in the church-yard, directly South of the great transept: When was this taken down, and what was its form and character?

Of Thomas Mede, to whom there is a fine monument in the North aile, I am desirous of obtaining some par ticulars; also of Sir William Penn, whose birth-place is not satisfactorily ascertained: also of John Jay; John

Inyn; William Coke; John Brook; John Bleaker; Everandus le French; &c. all of whom were buried in this Church.

In asking so many questions, I cannot even hope to obtain answers to all; but still I trust that, as my object is to elucidate history, substantiate fact, and thus gratify laudable and enlightened curiosity, I shall derive some assistance from those who have the power to disseminate information, and are actuated by li beral feelings. It must be apparent to all classes of readers, that many useful and truly curious facts and documents are shut up in private libraries, and confined to the memories of certain persons, the developement of which would prove highly interesting. Rublic channels are now numerous, and every possessor may thereby be queath antiquarian treasures to the world..

Allow me, Mr. Urban, to inform your readers that I am now collecting and arranging materials for concise topographical accounts of Wiltshire and Warwickshire, to constitute a volume of the " Eeauties of England.” Both these counties I intend to visit this autumn, to examine buildings and places; ascertain what is accurate in the histories of preceding Topographers, and endeavour to obtain new information. In consequence of continued opposition and personal insults from the former Publisher of that work, I was impelled to relinquish it about three years back; but I must own that I return to it, at the solicitation of its present respectable Publisher, with renewed pleasure and ardour. The pursuit is congenial to my feelings, and every County and every subject brings with it new pleasures, and increasing sources of information. The County of Wilts is already familiar to me; for during the last ten years I have been progres sively accumulating topographical materials. Warwickshire has peculiar charms to the Antiquary and Local Historian, as the birth-places of Dugdale, Shakespear, Wanley, Carte, and Drayton, must be dear to every Englishman or Briton who can feel and appreciate the respective merits of these illustrious" Worthies." The noble castles of this county, its monastic remains, and antient city of Coventry, are all replete with interest,

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I don't recollect any thing worth mentioning on this road, except that when you come to Selkirk you should inquire for Melross Abbey.—I would advise you to lye there, as the house is a very decent one. It is not above 5 or 6 miles out of the road to Edinburgh.

If you make any stay at Edinburgh, I advise you to take a lodging; and even for a night you will be much better accommodated than at the Inns

You will, of course, see HolyroodHouse, the Castle, &c. I advise you, however, not to see Leith (their Wapping), which they generally send strangers to.

Remember to buy an Edinburgh Almanack, which will furnish you with the distance between place and place.

As you intend to view the Camelon Inscriptions (if any can be found), you must go to Linlithgow.-Mrs. Macfun's there is a very decent Inn. See the Palace.

Sterling, see the Castle and Palace.

Crief (Mrs. Murray's, an excellent house). In the road to Crief, not far from Dumblain, is the famous Camp of Ardoch, a little to your right hand.

Perth (go thence to Scoon), and cross the Tay to Dunkeld. This is a most enchanting situation; and you may spend a day very well at the excellent Inn of Kinvere. See the Duke

of

of Athol's Policy, as it is called; the Hermitage, and the rumbli g Brig.

See what remains of the old Palace. From hence to Dunkeld you are in Shakspearean ground. Inquire for Dunsinane's high hill (which the Scotch pronounce Dunsinnan, nor is it an excessively high hill.) You will

by Berwick, though that by Coldstream is a better one for horse or carriage.

Many thanks for your memorandam with regard to the Bala fish. DAINES BARRINGTON,

Mr. URBAN,

pass through Bitnam Wood, about HA

2 miles from Dunkeld.

Blair; cross the river at Logareit, and proceed to Kenmore; an excelleut inn, near Lord Bredalbane's. This is most capital head quarters; and you may see some portraits at Lord Bredalbane's by Jameson, who is called the Scotch Vandyke *.

At the end of Loch Tay, near a public-house called Kinell, they shew Ossian's tomb, the landlord being somewhat of an Antiquary.

Dainacardock, and thence to Inverness, all the stages affording very good accommodation. Thence to Forres and Elgin, between which

towns there is a famous Obelisk on the road.

From Forres I returned in one of my Highland Tours by Castles Grant and Bremar; but I believe the returning by Aberdeen will answer better.

If you want to see Glasgow, you must return from Inverness by Forts Augustus and William Lubenarnack; Tayndrom; Dalwhiny; Inverary; Tarbet; Dunbarton; and thence to Glasgow.

At Glasgow there is a Church under the old Cathedral, as formerly in Old Paul's, and now at Canterbury. Don't see Mr. Foulis's pictures; they are

execrable.

If you don't choose to go so far Northward as Inverness, then go from Lord Bredalbane's to Tayndrom, Dalwhiny, Inverary, Tarbet, Duabarton, and Glasgow.

N. B. Tayndrom was the only very indifferent Inn that I stopped at in either of my Highland tours.

From Glasgow go to Hamilton. There are some good pictures in the Palace there,

If you have time, go to Lanerk, to see the famous fall of the Clyde called Cora Lyn.

From Hamilton you will have a very good turnpike to Edinburgh again, and will probably return the old road

*See Part I. p. 258, EDIT.

July 3. AVING some trifling claim to your attention as Publisher of your Miscellany, I am induced to think you will insert a few observations in reply to your Correspondent C. W.'s Letter from Kingston, which appeared in last month's number. It is relative to a Drawing of Swaffhum Two Churches, which he complains of being kept from insertion, for a long space of time, in the BEAUTIES OF ENGLAND, and at length erroneously described on the Plate. I have the Drawing now before me, and am ready to admit every thing he asserts, excepting that of a deviation from it by the Engraver, which, upon strict examination, I cannot discover.

There may be some little excuse allowed for the rest of the Proprietors, as well as myself, if a few inaccuracies occur, as the work came into my hands very suddenly, in consequence of the death of its former Publisher ;· but these I shall, at all times, be happy to correct when pointed out.

i beg further to say, that the work, I hope, has lost nothing of its consequence, by the small portion Messrs. Brayley and Britton have lately contributed; as such persons have been engaged, who have ability and dili gence, and are at all times to be depended on. I have, however, to mention, that Mr. Britton is now writing the Descriptions of Warwickshire and Wiltshire and, I suppose, Mr. Brayley intends finishing London and Middlesex. If C. W. is desirous of having his Drawing returned, it shall be forwarded to him, by sending his address to J. HARRIS, Corner of St. Paul's.

Mr. URBAN, July 6. HE following Letter was addresTHE sed, Nov. 27, 1718, by the Nonjuring Clergy to Dr. Wake, at that time Archbishop of Canterbury.

"May it please your Grace,

"The persuasion we have of your Grace's unquestionable zeal for his Mar jesty's interest, your affectionate concern for the welfare of this Church, and desirable

sirable concord of her Ministers and Members, both encourage us to acquaint you that there is a promising appearance of a happy agreement with our qualified Brethren, who have kindly accepted our address, presented to the last Commission of Assembly, entreating their concurrence in making request to the Government for our being eased of the Abjuration Oath, either by having it intirely laid aside, or altered so as to relieve us of these scruples that hitherto we could not overcome; and in case the Government find a reimposition of the Oath necessary, as there is a draught of the Oath acceptable to us, together with our Address and the Commission's Act thereupon transmitted to your Grace, we must humbly request of your Grace

that it be allowed us in the words of our own formula, in regard small alterations may occasion new difficulties. As your eminent station and influence put you in a condition to serve the Interest of this Church, and there being nothing we know can serve her Interest to better advantage than true peace amongst her Friends, therefore we hope your Grace will exert that power which God hath put in your hands, for promoting the ends of our Address; and are,

"May it please your Grace, "Your Grace's most humble Servants in Christ,

"Jo. FEINT. "JAMES HART.

"WM. MILLER. "NEIL MCVICAR."

A METEOROLOGICAL JOURNAL, kept at CLAPTON, in Hackney.

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The weather during the whole of the period included by this Journal, has been changeable, and generally showery; at least there have been more days in each week that it has rained, than wholly dry days.

Clapton, July 22, 1812.

THOMAS FORSTER.

Mr.

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