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ANNOTATIONIS SACRE;

BEING A

CRITICAL DIGEST

AND

SYNOPTICAL ARRANGEMENT

OF THE MOST IMPORTANT

ANNOTATIONS ON THE NEW TESTAMENT,
EXEGETICAL, PHILOLOGICAL, AND DOCTRINAL :

CAREFULLY COLLECTED AND CONDENSED, FROM THE BEST COMMENTATORS,
BOTH ANCIENT AND Modern,

AND SO DIGESTED AS TO FORM ONE CONSISTENT BODY OF ANNOTATION,

In which

Each Portion is systematically attributed to its respective Author,

AND THE FOREIGN MATTER TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH;

The whole accompanied with

A COPIOUS BODY OF ORIGINAL ANNOTATIONS.

mull

BY THE REV. S. T. BLOOMFIELD, M. A.

OF SIDNEY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, VICAR OF BISBROOKE IN RUTLAND, AND RESIDENT
CURATE OF TUGBY, LEIcestershire.

Οὐ σοφισταὶ ἥκομεν, οὐδὲ ἀπιστεῖν ἕτοιμοι, θεαταὶ δε μόνον τῶν
γεγραμμένων, ἐξετάζομεν τὴν Γραφήν.

Philostr, Jun. Icon. 1, 24.

Οπου οὐκ ἔστι πίστις, ἅπαντα νοσεῖ, καὶ οὐδὲν ἄλλο ἢ μάχαι τίκτονται
λόγων, τοῦ πιθανοτέρου τὸν ἕτερον ἀνατρέπειν δοκοῦντος· Ἡ πίστις
ὀφθαλμός ἐστιν· ὁ μὴ ἔχων ὀφθαλμοὺς οὐδὲν εὑρίσκει, ἀλλὰ μόνον
Ζητεῖ.

Theophylact, from Chrysostom.

VOL. VII.

LONDON:

C. AND J. RIVINGTON,

62, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH-YARD; AND 3, WATERLOO-PLACE, PALL-MALL.

MDCCCXXVIII.

phyl. observes, is meant to excite them to union; since those who are split into factions are no ecclesia, that suggesting the idea of one united assembly. Σὺν τοῖς ἁγίοις πᾶσι τοῖς οὖσιν ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ̓Αχαίᾳ. By this is meant simply all the Christians in Corinth and Achæa. The term 'ay. was employed to designate Christians, as hinting to them what their solemn engagements oblige them to be; and if some individuals were otherwise, it must be remembered, that the Apostle is addressing them in a general way. He conjoins the Achæans, in order to do honour to Corinth as the capital of Achæa, and to excite them to a common federal Christian union. So Chrysost. and Theophyl.

2. χάρις-Χριστοῦ. The same form as in Rom. 1, 7. 1 Cor. 1, 3. where see the notes.

3. εὐλογητὸς ὁ Θεὸς καὶ πατὴρ τ.κ. η. I. X. Doddr. and Mackn. render: "praised be the God and Father of," &c., which interpretation may be defended; but I prefer the common version, "blessed be God, even the Father of," &c., which is supported by the authority of the Fathers and antient Commentators, and several eminent modern Critics. (See the excellent note of Whitby.) Grot. observes that this is an usual formula of thanksgiving; and Doddr. says it occurs in eleven out of the thirteen Epistles of St. Paul. On which he remarks, that as soon as the Apostle thought of a Christian church planted in one place or another, there seems to have been a flow of most lively affection accompanying the idea, in which all sensibility of his temporal affliction or theirs was all swallowed up, and the fulness of his heart must vent itself in such cheerful, exalted, and devout language."

Most sagacious are the following observations of Theoph. on the scope of the clause: 'Eyyεíñaто ÉV TỶ Επηγγείλατο ἐν πρώτῃ ἐπιστολῇ πρὸς αὐτοὺς ἐλθεῖν· εἶτα βραδύνας, σφόδρα ὑπώπτευσε λυπεῖσθαι αὐτοὺς, ὡς ἄλλων προτιμηθέντων αὐτῷ. Θέλων οὖν ἀπολογήσασθαι, καὶ δεῖξαι ὅτι πειρασμών πολλῶν αὐτῷ περιτεθέντων κεκώλυται, εὐφυῶς ποιεῖται τὴν

ἀπολογίαν. Εὐχαριστῶ γὰρ, φησι, τῷ Θεῷ δηλαδὴ, ὡς ῥυσαμένω με ἀπὸ κινδύνων· διὰ τῆς εὐχαριστίας αἰνιττόμενος, ὅτι μεγάλα τινὰ ἦσαν τὰ κωλύοντα αὐτὸν ὧν ἐλευ θερωθεὶς εὐχαριστεῖ.

3. πατὴς τῶν οἰκτιρμῶν, καὶ Θεὸς πάσης παρακλήσεως. Grot. observes that these genitives are used for adjectives of cognate signification with the substantive. This, however, seems but tasteless criticism. The truth is, though the phraseology may seem Hebraic, yet it is such as is used in other languages, and has more of energy and spirit than if adjectives had been employed. Theophyl. truly observes, that God is so named ἐκ τοῦ συμβεβηκότος. And Theod. admirably paraphrases: ὁ τοὺς οἰκτιρμούς πηγάζων, καὶ τὸν ἔλεον ἀναβλύζων, καὶ πατρικοῖς οἰκτιρμοῖς περὶ ἡμᾶς κεχρημένος. And Theoph. thus: ὁ οἰκτιρ μοὺς τοσούτους ἐπιδειξάμενος, ὡς ἐξ αὐτῶν τῶν τοῦ θανά του πολλῶν ἡμᾶς ἀναγαγεῖν, καὶ παρακλήσεως πάσης ἀξι ῶσαι ἐν ταῖς θλίψεσιν.

Wets. remarks that the Jews in their prayers used the expressions our Father, our merciful Father.

Παρακλήσεως, comfort, consolation. See Rom. 15, 4. Acts 4, 36. 2 Cor. 7, 4. and consult Tromm. Concord.

4. ὁ παρακαλῶν ἡμᾶς ἐπὶ πάσῃ τῇ θλίψει, “ who comforteth us in all our tribulations." This sense of παρακαλεῖν, which has occurred (at least conjointly) at Acts 16, 40. 20, 12. and several times in the Gospels, and which indeed is frequent in the New Testament (as 2 Cor. 2, 6. 7, 6. Eph. 6, 22. Col. 4, 8. 2 Thess. 2, 17. 2 Cor. 13, 11.) is supposed to be Hellenistical, as it is never found in the Classical writers. It signifies literally "to bid any one take comfort, by suggesting such motives and reasons for it as are calculated to raise the spirits of the sinking sufferer;" and, from the adjunct, it denotes every sort of comfort, support, and assistance by which he is revived in spirit, and restored to happiness.

It is observed by Grot., that the Apostle, not with

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